Episode 2: Speech Pathology The Animated Series™

Parents have a lot of questions about their child’s speech, understanding and language their first 12 months. In this video, we’ll discuss what you should generally expect of your child’s understanding and use of language in their first 12 months.

Parents have a lot of questions about their child’s speech, understanding and language their first 12 months. When should my child say their first words? Is language actually developing in this early stage? In this video, we’ll discuss what you should generally expect of your child’s understanding and use of language in their first 12 months. Many people do not realise that huge amounts of language development are occurring in a baby’s first 12 months. In a baby’s first 12 months they will develop eye contact, smiling, the ability to turn to noises and to you when you enter a room. Around 4-6 months they will respond to their own name, and with time they will respond to “no” and changes in the tone of your voice. As they near 12 months they will begin to respond to simple commands (“give it to mummy”) and it will seem like they are listening to your conversations. The first 12 months are also all about sounds! A newborn will make sounds to indicate comfort or pain. As months pass, they will begin “cooing”, exploring their voice (how loud and high they can go!). Around 8 months children use gesture expressively – through reaching and pointing for things. Children are babbling by 10 months. Babbling will be repeated (/mamama/ and differing /badegoo/). Around your little one’s first birthday, their first meaningful words will also emerge. An exciting milestone for all, especially those who are there to witness. If you have any concerns or would like information specific to your child, we recommend that you touch base with your speech pathologist.

Lauren Crumlish

Lauren Crumlish

Our blog series has been consciously created to answer the questions that we commonly receive from parents, teachers, and doctors. We also hope to bring awareness to the range and extent of communication challenges that children and teenagers may face in their home, school, and social environments. We hope that our blog series may also highlight the role and importance of paediatric speech pathology.